Community Voices

Sharing your perspective on policy issues is a powerful way to advocate on behalf of yourself, patients, and others in the medical community who have been impacted by various federal programs, initiatives, and legislation. It also shows policymakers how critical these programs are to ensuring the health of our patients, communities, and the health care workforce.

The AAMC Action community collects stories year-round to serve as powerful reminders of why it’s important to advocate for Graduate Medical Education (GME), medical research, health equity, and other key issues. View the unique insights from other community members below.

Share with Your Community

Join other AAMC Action community members who help advocate for the academic medicine community and share your connection to the below issues.

I am grateful for the AAMC's work in diversifying medical professionals. There is a shortage of medical doctors in all communities, especially communities that are underserved.
- Marilyn
Supporting both undergraduate and graduate medical education is VITAL to the future health and well-being of our country. We are suffering from medical deserts in urban and rural areas where caring and compassionate physicians are needed.
- Jonathan
I sent a letter to my representative because medical research is important for discovering new information about people, diseases, cures, and more. As a community health worker, I understand and want to see more health equity for many people including the underserved and underrepresented.
- Charlene
With many doctor shortages looming and stagnant funding to GME, we need to further the fight to enhance care while also ensuring graduates have a placement in programs.
- Nicholas
It is important to prioritize medical students and physicians as human beings and scholars. Empathy can not only be reserved for patients.
- Mahindra
I treat breast cancer patients in clinic and work at the lab bench. Medical research saves lives, and we see it firsthand. The immediacy is some patients who might’ve died of their breast cancer 10 years ago are cured today. What is challenging is that other patients are not cured and they continue to need our help.
- David
Load More